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Crime Stop: 262.6151

Area 51

The police have divided the city neighborhoods into Community Action areas. We are in Area 51, and Area 41 south of the freeway.

COMMUNITY ACTION OFFICERS (CAOs)

CAOs help form neighborhood Block Watch and Fight Back groups; perform security evaluations at homes and businesses; give community presentations on crime prevention; teach safety to kids in schools; resolve neighborhood problems by bringing in city agencies to help; and help solve crimes by providing patrol officers and detectives valuable tips.

The police have divided Phoenix neighborhoods into Community Action areas. Because of our unique location straddling I-10, F Q Story is in 2 areas. 
Ben Harris #8275
Community Action Officer
Mtn View Precinct
Benjamin.Harris@phoenix.gov
CL: 602-361-4501
Desk: 602-495-6882

Mario Ancich #4013
Community Action Officer
Central City Precinct
mario.ancich@phoenix.gov
CL: 602-495-5005
Desk: 602-534-1389

Misdemeanor and liquor license issues -
Officer Armida Gonzales #6190
Central City Precinct
602-534-6805
armida.gonzales@phoenix.gov

Police officers work four 10-hour days so it may take several days to get a call back.

Here is a link to the Phoenix PD part of the City website. Lots of news and info on programs, etc.

Online Crime Search Tool

This article is from the July 14, 2014 edition of the Republic:

Phoenix residents can now use a new crime-mapping tool that allows users to filter crime statistics by crime type, date, location and other details.

Traffic: Want to find out just how bad the traffic is on the freeways? Check out ADOT's traffic cameras.


WHAT IS BLOCK WATCH?

Here are definitions from around our continent.

The Block Watch program fights the isolation and separation that crime creates and feeds upon, it forges bonds among area residents and businesses, helps reduce burglaries and other crime, and improves relations between the police and the community they serve.
—BLOCK WATCH SOCIETY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

Block Watch is a powerful yet simple program that really works, when neighbors make it work. It promotes neighborhoods where people talk to each other on the street, in their yards, in their homes, or by using a telephone tree. There is more crime in neighborhoods where people mind their own business and stay to themselves. These two types of neighborhoods have differences that are obvious to the "bad guys". I guess you know which type they prefer.
—City of Kent, Washington

Becoming acquainted with your neighbors.
Working together to solve problems in your neighborhood.
Helping the police by being aware of and reporting any unusual activities as they occur. You know best what is "normal" activity in your neighborhood.
Learning to prevent and detect crime in your neighborhood and taking the necessary steps to make it safer (i.e. utilizing locks, lighting, etc.)
Reporting suspicious persons. NOT apprehending, leave that for the police.
Looking out for your neighbors.
—Chandler, AZ PD

A block watch is a self-help, anticrime program in which the key to success is community involvement.
Citizens act as "extra eyes and ears" to report crime and suspicious activity to the Police and to each other in an organized manner.
Block Watch does not require exposing yourself or family to any dangerous situations.
Block Watch means communicating with your neighbors to improve the quality of life on your street.
Block Watch means getting to know others who are willing to help keep your territory safe. Working as a group, you can accomplish more than as an individual.
  —New Haven, CT /Yale Block Watch

WHAT IS BLOCK WATCH NOT?

Block Watch members are NOT vigilantes. They are the extra eyes and ears for reporting
crimes and helping their neighbors. Members learn how to make their homes more secure, watch out for each other’s homes and the neighborhood. They report activities that raise their suspicions to the Police Department.

Block Watch does NOT promote intervention.

Block Watch is NOT Phoenix Neighborhood Patrol, another local program that trains groups from interested neighborhoods in observation skills, criminal codes, police procedures, and drug recognition through non-confrontational methods.  For additional information on the neighborhood patrol program, go to http://phoenix.gov/POLICE/bwonpa1.html

CRIME PREVENTION

PERSONAL SAFETY RESOURCES

Child Print ID Kits
Our Community Action Officers have, in the past, provided us with Child Print ID Kits. These kits, printed by Brinks Home Security, allow parents to store fingerprints, dental information, DNA information, etc, to be used in the unlikely event the child is missing.

Babysitter Information
Information to give your babysitter so s/he will be more safety conscious while watching your children is at http://phoenix.gov/POLICE/babysi1.html

PROPERTY RESOURCES

Phoenix Police Department

Following is a sample of the kinds of helpful information which is available on the Phoenix PD website.  Go to the site for even more information.

Identity Theft Victim’s Packet
Information, form letters, recommended actions for victims of identity theft are available on the Phoenix Police Department website at the following address:  http://phoenix.gov/POLICE/idtheft_packet.pdf

Document Crimes – ID theft, credit card fraud, forgery & the like
Information on preventing and responding to a variety of crimes categorized as Document Crimes is available at http://phoenix.gov/POLICE/dcd1.html

Property Inventory
Be prepared to help police recover your property in case you are burglarized. Download a property inventory form from the City's web site. List your personal property details that can help the police in case of a burglary.

Questions about whether a particular car is stolen or not?
Go to http://theftaz.azag.gov/ and type in license plate number or VIN number to see if a car has been reported as stolen. In that same vein, here's a vehicle description form. (pdf)

Burglary Prevention
Tips to help you avoid becoming a victim of burglary can be found at http://phoenix.gov/POLICE/burgti1.html. See also our Burglary Prevention page.

Graffiti Hotline
602.262.7327
Rewards of up to $250 are available to people who report graffiti crimes after an arrest or other successful resolution is made.

Questions about whether an alarm company is on the up and up?
Each alarm company doing business in the city of Phoenix is required to be licensed by the city. To find out if an alarm company or an alarm company agent is licensed, go to
phoenix.gov/APPINTRO/alaintro.html

OTHER SOURCES YOU MIGHT INVESTIGATE FOR CRIME PREVENTION INFORMATION

ARIZONA ATTORNEY GENERAL
http://www.azag.gov/

MARICOPA COUNTY SHERIFF
http://www.mcso.org/

 ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY
http://www.azdps.gov/

LAW ENFORCEMENT WEBSITES

Sex Offenders

You can view a complete listing of sex offenders at azsexoffender.org.
Here's another sex offender website

Also check out az.gov/webapp/offender

Other Sites

Stolen vehicles: Enter the license plate number of a possibly stolen vehicle to see if it is listed on the site. if so, call the law enforcement agency that listed it as stolen.

Check out DUI convicts

At Silent Witness, you can search for a perp based on physical characteristics such as hair and eye color.

Sheriff Joe has an online database listing 30,000 people with warrants in Maricopa County.


PATROL WATCH

This was submitted by Liz on the message board: I called Suspicious Activity line. Here is what I was told. That number only records the call-in info..it is NOT put on the official police "blotter". You have to ask for a police officer to call you back before it gets noticed.
A police officer gave me some interesting info. Anyone of us can call for a day or night patrol. We have to call and ask for it but they will include the area in question as part of their patrol route........ Maybe those of you with on-going problems can use this to slow down some of the stuff going on in your alleys or around your homes.
Here's the number: 495-5005. Ask for a PATROL WATCH.

IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS: CRIME STOP:
262.6151 (For nonemergency, suspicious activity)
CRIMES IN PROGRESS: 911

Emergency Info guide

Here's a guide to resources for information on such situations as car theft, home protection, poisons, etc.

Alley lights

By Bob Croft

If you’d like the added safety and security of nighttime lighting in your alley, APS has just the program.
    APS’s Dawn to Dusk Lighting Service will provide a 100-watt high pressure sodium lamp (that’s pretty bright) on an existing power pole in the alley, for a monthly charge of $10.28 plus tax, added to your monthly electric bill.  Installation is free if you agree to a several year contract.  You’d need to secure permission from your alley neighbors affected. (As most power poles sit close to the property line, that means the 3 neighbors whose lots touch the corner of your lot that the power pole sits on).  You could also hit those neighbors to help with the cost – but APS needs to put the entire $10.28 on one person’s bill.
    If one of those neighbors wants to have his backyard screened from the light (I got a story about folks wanting to skinny dip in private, at night), APS can install a shield on the light for about $45.00, if done at the time of the light installation.
    In passing, I’d urge our neighbors with corner lots to look at the program; it would provide us all some sidewalk and street lighting in the mid-block of our north-south streets.
    For more info, or to order, call Rick Benevidez at APS, 602-371-7263, or give me a holler at 602-695-3337.